Installing WordPress using php 7 on Synology

A quick guide

 

Installation of WordPress (from WordPress.org) instead of the official Synology Package has several advantages:

  1. It allows you to install several copies in different folders for different websites. (The Synology Package doesn’t allow this)
  2. It allows you change the config file to allow WordPress to source updates directly from WordPress.org so that you can get security updates as soon as they are released.  (It can take several weeks if not months for WordPress to provide Synology with an updated version)
  3. It allows you to run WordPress under php 7 which is faster and more secure than the php 5.6 that Synology’s Package uses. (php5.6 is at end of life . Support stopped 19 Jan 2017, and security fixes will cease 31 Dec 2018.  Upgrading is therefore imperative)

But there’s a snag, for some people.  Installing a new WordPress site in php 7, or changing an existing one from php 5.6 to php 7 may cause the installation to hang, with a white screen of death.

This problem won’t affect all users.  The root cause is unclear but seems to be related to the way php7 is first implemented on a Synology Disk Station.  It’s  likely that if a Synology default installation occurred prior to it being used to install WordPress, the php error log that was created is hidden somewhere.  Synology packages that use php 7 don’t use Web Station, whereas WordPress.org installations do, and Web Station is where the log file link needs to be.

The absence of an accessible log file means that when a WordPress installation is attempted, there is nowhere for the installation process to write messages to.  This causes the WordPress “Famous Five-Minute Install” to hang.

Pinning down the exact reason is difficult and is not a good use of your time because if it happens, the fix is simple.  Create a log file.  The details of how to do this and how to connect it to php7 in Web Station can be found here:

Link to instructions on how to install a php7 log file in Synology DSM

Once a log file exists, the WordPress “Famous Five-Minute Installation” will proceed as normal.

 

Shout out to

Steve Davis, whose suggestion to look at the php error logs led to the diagnosis of this glitch, and who provided the "How to fix it" article in the link above

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>